Images & Observations

Hale House

Another Time

Nikon D7000 18-135mm @ 20mm ISO 200 7-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1; PsCS5

Prior to capturing the image of the “Heritage Boxcar” that I posted this past Monday, I captured a few sets of brackets of the Hale House at Heritage Square, Los Angeles.  The Hale House was constructed in 1887 in the Queen Anne and Eastlake styles by George W. Morgan who was a land speculator and real estate developer.  The house was moved from its original location to a second location and changed hands a number of times before being purchased by James Gl Hale.  Hale lived in the house a few years until he separated from his wife Bessie.  After the separation Bessie Hale retained title to the house and lived in it until her death in a rest home in 1967, and ran the house as a boarding home for much of that time.  The house was donated to the Cultural Heritage Foundation by Bessie Hale’s heir in 1970 and it was moved to its current location.

I have to say I am fairly proud of this image, I think it demonstrates that I have made some more progress practicing my HDR techniques.  I started by mounting the Nikon D7000 on a tripod with the 18-135mm lens and with my Promote Control interfaced to the camera.  I had Judy hold up a gray card in front of the house for one shot.   I fired off a few sets of seven brackets (-3 EV to +3 EV) with slightly varying perspectives on the house and converted the camera raw files to DNG in Lightroom.  Initially in the Lightroom Develop module I used the automatic color correction tool to key on the gray card and set the proper color setting on all the files, and I also used the automatic lens correction tool to correct any distortion.  I exported the selected seven brackets to Nik’s HDR Efex Pro and applied one of the Realistic pre-sets which I then tweaked, then  I converted to TIFF and sent the image file back to Lightroom.  I then opened the HDR TIFF file and the middle bracket (-0-) DNG file in Photoshop.  I then used layer masking to overlay the top of the chimney and the sky from the middle bracket to correct the top of the chimney which was blown out in the HDR and to replace a halo-ed sky with a clean sky.  I also used content aware fill in Photoshop to remove a water faucet, garden hose, and some scattered cinder blocks from the lawn in front of the house.  Back in Lightroom I made a slight crop to remove some of the gravel foreground, sharpened and applied minimal noise filtering.

Advertisements

11 responses

  1. Great work Wayne, I love the comp and the processing.

    July 6, 2011 at 8:19 AM

  2. Thanks, Jason.

    July 6, 2011 at 9:01 AM

  3. lovely colors, well done Wayne!

    July 6, 2011 at 10:39 AM

  4. Thanks, Jim. I had fun with this one.

    July 6, 2011 at 10:41 AM

  5. ken bello

    When I clicked on the photo I can see from the high resolution file that there was a lot of detail work and craftsmanship in these old Victorian houses. They don’t build them like that anymore. Nice work with the post, Wayne, very nice.

    July 6, 2011 at 11:25 AM

  6. Thanks for the comment, Ken. I really like the detail work on those old houses, one of the tags I put on that image file is “ginger bread” which Webster’s defines as ” lavish or superfluous ornament especially in architecture”, and that it is.

    July 6, 2011 at 12:01 PM

  7. great shot Wayne. I love all your added history info.

    July 8, 2011 at 11:23 AM

  8. Thanks, Sheila. It is fun researching the places I am photographing.

    July 9, 2011 at 6:25 PM

  9. jason bennett

    oh I think you nailed it!!!!

    July 11, 2011 at 8:06 PM

  10. Thanks, Jason B.

    July 11, 2011 at 8:14 PM

  11. Pingback: Hale House Re-visited « Wayne Frost's Photo Blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s