Images & Observations

Hose #1; An Exercise In Post Processing

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 12mm ISO 1600 1/20 +2EV -2EV f/8 Lr3, HEP1, CEP3; PsCS5

We are still at the San Bernardino Railroad & History Museum this week, and as we started last week off with a vintage piece of fire fighting apparatus, this week starts with a view of SAN B’DINO HOSE No. 1, a horse drawn truck for transporting the fire hose to the fire.

As with the majority of my images, the three frames that make up this image were shot hand-held.  The camera raw images were converted to DNG in Lightroom and then processed with Nik Software’s HDR Efrex Pro using a custom preset that I had previously devised.  This composited the three images together and tone mapped the result.  I used a custom preset in HDR Exfex Pro that I had previously devised, and the composite image only required very minimal “tweaking”.  The image was then moved in to Photo Shop and a duplicate background layer was created which then had a Gaussian blur applied.  I then masked out the fire truck, removing the blur from the truck.  A duplicate layer was created and then processed in Nik’s Color Efex Pro 3, the entire image, except the masked out truck, was modified by applying Color Efex Pro’s Midnight-Bright Sepia filter.  There was minor fine tuning along the way, and I spent some time magnifying the image and cleaning up edges of masking that overlapped, or underlapped.

I thoroughly enjoyed post processing this image and I think it has a nice, vintage feel to it, yet retains great clarity and detail on the truck.

Please click on the image to view it in high resolution.

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6 responses

  1. That’s a nice shot man. I like the shadows.

    January 17, 2012 at 9:40 AM

  2. Beautiful work, man. That truck looks awesome and your processing technique really paid off nicely. Well done!

    January 19, 2012 at 5:33 PM

    • Thanks, Jimi, yes I am quite pleased with this image.

      January 27, 2012 at 10:54 AM

  3. nice – I’m liking all your museum shots! bet they would too.

    January 24, 2012 at 3:28 AM

    • Thanks, Sheila. You do make a good point, the museum people might like these, maybe I’ll offer them to the museum.

      January 27, 2012 at 10:56 AM

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