Images & Observations

Posts tagged “bomber

B-25 “Photo Fanny”

Nikon D80 10-24mm @ 22mm ISO 800 1/20 f/8 Lr4; PsCS6

“Photo Fanny”, a B-25J, was assembled in 1944 and is part of the collection at the Planes of Fame Air Museum, and flies from their hanger at the Chino, California airport.  Photo Fanny has also been known as “Shangrila” and “Betty Grable” and was flown in the 1992 motion picture “Foreever Young” and the 2001 motion picture “Pearl Harbor”, flying off of the carrier USS Constellation.

Prints of this and other aircraft are available here: http://goo.gl/zZohQ .


B-25 Mitchell

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 10mm ISO 1250 3-bkts f/18 Lr4; PsCS6

This is another angle on “Mitch The Witch II” that was featured in an earlier post.  As described in the earlier post, “Mitch The Witch II” has had a colorful history and is still flying out of the Palm Springs Air Museum.  I’ve started playing with the HDR Pro filter in Photoshop CS6 and used it on this image, I am liking the results I am getting with this, but I have also recently upgraded to HDR Efex Pro 2 and am liking those results also.

Prints of this and other aircraft are available here: http://goo.gl/zZohQ .


Mitch The Witch II

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 10mm ISO 1250 3-bkts f/18 Lr3, HEP1, TpzAdj; PsCS5

Mitch the Witch II’s current home is the Palm Springs Air Museum, where it is a part of the collection that is still flown.  The B-25 manufactured by North American Aviation was a medium bomber developed in 1940 and deployed in 1941; 9,984 B-25’s were eventually built.  The B-25 first gained fame as the bomber used in the 18 April 1942 Doolittle Raid, in which 16 B-25Bs led by the legendary Lieutenant Colonel Jimmy Doolittle attacked mainland Japan, four months after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.  On Saturday, 28 July 1945, at 0940 (while flying in thick fog), a USAAF B-25D crashed into the north side of the Empire State Building, hitting between the 79th and 80th floor. 14 people were killed — 11 in the building, along with Colonel William Smith and the other two occupants of the bomber.[9] Betty Lou Oliver, an elevator attendant, survived the impact and a subsequent uncontrolled descent with the elevator. It was partly because of this incident that Towers 1 and 2 of the World Trade Center were designed to withstand the impact of a Boeing 707 aircraft (though the planes that hit the towers on September 11, 2001 had significantly higher masses and were traveling at substantially higher speeds).  (Source: Wikipedia.)

North American B-25J Mitchell, N8163H Mitch the Witch II was delivered to the Army Air Corps as 44-86747. It is restored as B-25C 42-87293. Its construction number is 108-47501. After the war, it was converted to a TB-25N trainer. The Air Force retired it in 1958 and stored it at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. Alton C. Mosley of Fairbanks, Alaska gave it its current registration on May 4, 1959. In July 1959 it was converted to a fire fighting tanker with a 2,000-gallon retardent tank. Merric Inc of Anchorage, Alaska bought it in April 1961 and sold it to RJD Corporation of Fairbanks in February 1965. Aero Retardant of Fairbanks bought it in April 1967 and operated it as tanker #7. Noel M. Wien of Anchorage, Alaska bought it in February 1977 ands sold it to the Planes of Fame Air Museum of Chino, California in 1978. Robert Pond and Planes Of Fame East of Spring Park, Minnesota bought it in March 1986. It has been part of the collection of the Palm Springs Air Museum since 1997. It flew as the Ruptured Duck in the movie Pearl Harbor.  (Source: Air & Space.)