Images & Observations

Posts tagged “box

Urban Study #44; Verticality

Nikon D7000 18-200mm @ 20mm ISO 1600 1/500, 1/125, 1/30 f/16 Lr4, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

A big box store at the Chino Spectrum & Marketplace in Chino, California.  I like the vertical lines and the warm color tones that play against the cool evening sky.


“Doctor Who, your transport is ready.”

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @10mm ISO 800 3-bkts f/20 Lr3, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

Is it really Doctor Who’s time traveling machine or just a classic British telephone box found at a British themed mini-mall in Pasadena, California?

Please click on the image to view in high resolution.


Box Jewelers Street Clock

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 14mm ISO 200 3-bkts f/16 Lr3; HEP1

Sometime between 1913 and 1914 Dr. William G. Barks opened a combined optometry and jewelry business at 507 South Myrtle Avenue in Monrovia, California and erected the street clock manufactured by the Brown Street Clock Company.  The clock was originally powered by a spring-wound clock mechanism that was subsequently converted to an electrical powered mechanism.  In 1921 Glen L. Box (FKA Glen L. DeBoxx) bought the jewelry business and the street clock from Dr. Barks.  In 1931 Box moved the business and the clock across the street to 518 South Myrtle Avenue; Glen L. Box died in 1951 and his widow, Ivah Box sold the store and clock to Shields Krutzsch, who then sold the store to Sam and Jeaneane Silverman in 1969.   In 2002 the clock was declared Monrovia Landmark #32 and in 2003 the Silvermans transferred ownership of the clock to the Monrovia Historic Preservation Group.

The clock and various businesses on Myrtle Avenue have been a location of television and motion picture filming at various times due to it’s proximity to Hollywood and the overall small town period look of the businesses on the street.  The city of Monrovia has done a great job rejuvenating the street-scape of its original town center which has attracted viable businesses such as merchandisers, service providers, and the food and beverage sector; attracting residents of the extended local area as a pleasant place to spend their time.

We had a great time capturing this image and the others to come in the blog this week while doing our photo walk on Myrtle Avenue in Monrovia on an early June evening.

A hat tip to the Monrovia Patch which was one of my sources for this post.


The Hardware Store

Nikon D80 10-24mm @ 10mm ISO 200 3-bkts f/22 HDR Efex Pro SEP2

This is Patterson Hardware on Central Avenue in Fillmore, California.  If you are a member of the digital generation you may not know what an independent hardware store looked like, back in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  No big box warehouse like emporium, no big national chain operation, no Home Depot and Lowe’s duopoly with a large corporate advertising budget.  Just a guy in a store front, with a sign on the front,  the time to devote to his customers, and a lifetime of tools, widgets, and sundry objects packed on the shelves and cataloged in his mind.

As I was capturing brackets out on the sidewalk, Judy was inside engaging in some commerce.  She had remembered that she needed some little odd ball doodad that has something to do with a lampshade and headed inside to see the man.  He fixed her right up.  Better than a possibly unsuccessful special trip to the big box store.

After HDR processing I used Nik Silver Efex Pro 2 to convert to black and white, and give the image a vintage look.