Images & Observations

Posts tagged “brick

Cafe Opera & Bakery

Roadside Americana

Nikon D7000 18-200mm @ 40mm ISO 200 1/125 F/11 Lr4, TpzSim; PsCS6

On Myrtle Avenue in the pedestrian friendly Old Town, Monrovia, California.  There are quite a few restaurants and retauraunt/bars in this neighborhood.

To view in high resolution or to purchase this or similar prints please click here: http://goo.gl/DDUfc

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Wall Detail #130

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO 200 1/125 f/11 Lr4, TpzSim; PsCS6

This is a section of the wall depicted in my last post.  I found the color and textures of the brick and mortar interesting, and the remnants of the painted advertising information.

To view in high resolution or to purchase this or similar prints please click here: http://goo.gl/DDUfc


Back Door of Commerce

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 12mm ISO 200 1/50 f/11 Lr4, TpzSim; PsCS6

This is a section of commercial building wall that originally faced an alley behind “D” Street in Chino, California.  This was the home of a hardware store at one time.  I was attracted by the textures, colors and remnants of commerce painted on the wall.

To view in high resolution or to purchase this or similar prints please click here: http://goo.gl/DDUfc


Waiting For The Light

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO 640 3-bkts f/25 Lr3, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

It was an early summer evening in Glendora, California when we came upon this scene.  The light changed to green and the woman went on here way, and we proceeded across and up the street to capture shop windows in the fading light.


Corner Bakery

Interpretive Digital Imaging

Nikon D80 18-135mm @ 22mm ISO 250 1/400 f/11 Lr3, TpzSim; PsCS5

This is a re-interpretation of the image featured in my “Man Cannot Live By Eating Cake Alone…” blog post.  When I first processed this image, rendering it as a straight forward HDR color image just did not speak to me, which is why I went with the sepia toned black & white.  After I re-approached the color image this time around I followed my instinct to imbue it with painterly effects and I am very happy how this works for me.  This is a far more expressive image than a straight color image, HDR or not, would be.


Signal Tower & Bridge Superstructure

Interpretive Digital Imaging

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 10mm ISO 1600 1/640 f/13 Lr3, ASSA3; PsCS5

This is the signal tower and west end of the pedestrian bridge at the Riverside, California Metrolink Station.  In addition to the stairways, patrons are served by an elevator in the west brick tower and one in the east brick tower, which was the only way I was able to get up on the bridge for yesterday’s image of the freight passing through.

This image is another example of my practicing simplifying images from the initial photo realism in order to convey more of a general feeling of the subjects (instead of a literal representation) so that the viewers’ minds can fill in any details they may imagine.  There is just the hint of the train in the background of this image, but I believe it is enough to enable the viewer to understand there was a train there.

There was much more detail of individual bricks in the elevator tower in my original capture and I purposely softened the detail and over saturated the coloring of the bricks.  I also liked the two converging lines from the crosswalk and upped the saturation and brightness of those as they converged on the tower and bridge.  And of course the processes I applied, including the introduction of a canvas texture resulted in a very painterly rendering.  (This and all of my images are in my gallery and the tools in the gallery will allow you to see the images in full size or near full size, then the texture will become quite apparent.)


The Dance Studio

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 14mm ISO 640 3-bkts f/11 Lr3; HEP1

The sign in the window caught my eye as I reconnoitered this old brick building at the corner of Lemon Street and University Avenue in Riverside, California.  The handrail along the sidewalk made me think of a ballet barre, a juxtaposition of significance in my mind.  This building is now known as the Life Arts Center and it leases space to visual and performing artists, it was originally constructed in 1909 as the Riverside YMCA and was owned by the Church of Scientology at one time and was developed to its present state by group headed by a man that splintered from the Church of Scientology.  There is an interesting article about the history of the building here in the Riverside Press Enterprise.

Another notable feature of this image is that this building continues the local motif of arched windows in the Spanish/Mission Revival style.


The Annex

Another Time

 

Nikon D7000 18-135mm @ 62mm ISO 400 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1; SEP2

Across Sixth Street from the back side of the hotel, sits the Mission Inn Annex in Riverside, California.  As reported in the Riverside Press Enterprise:

The crumbling brick structure behind Riverside’s historic Mission Inn has housed staff and servants, a series of shops, and finally storage, but it has been largely unused for years.

Built in two sections in 1913 and 1926, the annex began as living quarters for first female [which may explain the foot bridge over the street connecting the annex to the hotel and keeping female staff isolated from the street] and then male inn workers. The upper floors were used by the private staff — butlers and maids — of inn guests, said Kevin Hallaran, an archivist for the Riverside Metropolitan Museum.

Now the Mission Inn annex is being considered for a makeover. Riverside city officials are interested in turning the annex into conference space to complement the planned expansion of the nearby convention center.

The building facade is beautiful, however it seems the interior is crumbling and is far from being up to code.  The city of Riverside seems to be well attuned to its architectural heritage and I hope they can rehabilitate this structure.  Worth noting are the rounded arches creating a colonnade along the front of the building’s perimeter, mimicking the arches in the Spanish/Mission Revival architecture of the Mission Inn across the street.  You will find this arch motif in other period structures throughout downtown Riverside.

After initial processing of this image I spent some time working with the color version and tweaking it using Nik’s Color Efex Pro, but in the end decided that it might work better without the full color spectrum and converted it with Nik’s Silver Efex Pro.  I darkened the automobiles and brought their clarity down, while simultaneously pushing up the detail in the building facade, applied a sepia tone, added vignetting and added the burned edges of the border, all to bring the image back to its period in time.