Images & Observations

Posts tagged “colonnade

The Chapel Doors

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 18mm ISO 640 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, CEP3; PSCS5

Just beyond the cornerstone is this colonnade that leads to the chapel doors of the First Congregational Church in Riverside, California.  It can get quite warm in Riverside and this passageway gives me a sense of the coolness that can be found in its shelter, and within the stone church building.  I purposely darkened the walls an columns and emphasized the warmth of the two sets of doors, and then also added blur to defocus on the sunny landscape just outside of the scene.  I really like the overhead beams and the doors in this scene combined with the perspective and selective focus.

 

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First Congregational Church

Nikon D7000 10-24mm at 18mm ISO 640 3-bkts f/16 Lr3; HEP1

The First Congregational Church is located at the corner of Mission Inn Avenue and Lemon Street in Riverside, California.  The church building takes its design cues, which include the arching colonnade from the Mission Inn which is across the street.  From the church’s web site:

The present church building is one of the most significant Spanish Revival structures existing in Southern California. It was designed by Myron Hunt, a leading California architect who also designed the Spanish Wing of the Mission Inn and the Rose Bowl in Pasadena.

The building is a brick structure with a concrete tower. Henry Jekel was the architectural engineer for the Spanish Baroque Churrigueresque tower. The cornerstone was laid December 1, 1912, and the building was dedicated on January 25, 1914. The original cost of the building was $100,000…

For many years the church’s 135′ bell tower was empty. in 1986, Don and Beth Miller began the Carillon Project in memory of their son, Scott. A Carillon was chosen, consisting of 24 bells, each of which rings a different pitch on the chromatic scale. The bells, which are the only pealing bells loacted in Southern California, were manufactured in France. In August 1989 installation began, and on October 1, 1989, the bells were dedicated as a memorialto loved ones and a gift of the church to the community.

The sound of the bells was quite appealing and imparted a sense of well being while we were in the neighborhood.

Processing for this image was fairly straightforward, I did amp up the saturation in the flower blossoms.


The Annex

Another Time

 

Nikon D7000 18-135mm @ 62mm ISO 400 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1; SEP2

Across Sixth Street from the back side of the hotel, sits the Mission Inn Annex in Riverside, California.  As reported in the Riverside Press Enterprise:

The crumbling brick structure behind Riverside’s historic Mission Inn has housed staff and servants, a series of shops, and finally storage, but it has been largely unused for years.

Built in two sections in 1913 and 1926, the annex began as living quarters for first female [which may explain the foot bridge over the street connecting the annex to the hotel and keeping female staff isolated from the street] and then male inn workers. The upper floors were used by the private staff — butlers and maids — of inn guests, said Kevin Hallaran, an archivist for the Riverside Metropolitan Museum.

Now the Mission Inn annex is being considered for a makeover. Riverside city officials are interested in turning the annex into conference space to complement the planned expansion of the nearby convention center.

The building facade is beautiful, however it seems the interior is crumbling and is far from being up to code.  The city of Riverside seems to be well attuned to its architectural heritage and I hope they can rehabilitate this structure.  Worth noting are the rounded arches creating a colonnade along the front of the building’s perimeter, mimicking the arches in the Spanish/Mission Revival architecture of the Mission Inn across the street.  You will find this arch motif in other period structures throughout downtown Riverside.

After initial processing of this image I spent some time working with the color version and tweaking it using Nik’s Color Efex Pro, but in the end decided that it might work better without the full color spectrum and converted it with Nik’s Silver Efex Pro.  I darkened the automobiles and brought their clarity down, while simultaneously pushing up the detail in the building facade, applied a sepia tone, added vignetting and added the burned edges of the border, all to bring the image back to its period in time.