Images & Observations

Posts tagged “engine

Power Plant #64

 

PowerPlant64__20120908-DSC_0064_P__© Wayne E FrostFound hanging around Myrtle Avenue, at the Street Rods Forever car show, Monrovia, California, 08-Sep-2012.

Click on image in blog to view in high resolution or to purchase a print.


“Oh, To Fly Again…”

Another salvage jet engine waiting on the tarmac at Planes of Fame Air Museum, Chino, California for another chance to fly.  I am fascinated by the mechanical contrivances that man can devise from inert matter that then have the ability to move matter through time and space.

Prints of this and other aircraft are available here: http://goo.gl/zZohQ .


Waiting For A Second Chance

Nikon D80 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO 200 1/30 f/11 Lr4

A salvaged jet engine on the tarmac at the Planes of Fame Air Museum, Chino, California.  I am fascinated by images of machinery, I believe there is a real beauty in machined parts assembled for a functional purpose.

Prints of this and other aircraft are available here: http://goo.gl/zZohQ .


Chino Fire Station 61

Nikon D7000 18-200mm @ 18mm ISO 200 1/2000 f/11 Lr4, TpzSim; PsCS5

Chino Valley Independent Fire District, Station 61 on Schaefer Avenue in Chino, California.  Their training facility occupies architecturally similar buildings adjacent, just out of frame on the right side (I’m working on a pano of the entire complex to share in the future).  The geometry and then the colors make this image for me.  I like the horizontal lines, the strong vertical lines of the light standard and the flag pole, and the strong diagonal line from the curb in the left foreground.  I also like the repetition of the square and rectangular shapes.


Engine 61 Responding

Nikon D7000 18-200mm @ 52mm ISO 200 1/500 f/11 Lr4, TpzSim; PsCS5

Engine 61 pulls out of its bay at Station 61 of the Chino Valley Independent Fire District on Schaefer Avenue in Chino, California.  Engine 61 is a paramedic fire company that consists of a captain, an engineer and  two firefighter/paramedics.  In many cases the captain and the engineer are also licensed paramedics.  After having Chino Valley Fire District personnel respond to my calls for help on more than one occasion, I can tell you these men are the real deal, skilled, strong, professional and heroic.


Always Prepared

Nikon D7000 18-200mm @ 48mm ISO 200 (-2EV, 0, +2EV) f/10 Lr4, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS6

Captured during one of our recent photo walks in Monrovia, California, the local fire house.


Ready To Roll

Interpretive Digital Imaging

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 13mm ISO 200 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

A final image from the Riverside, California Metrolink station, trackside looking north at two EMD F59PHI engines and the pedestrian bridge linking the west and east platforms.  (There are actually three platforms at this station, the west in the left foreground, the middle, between the two trains, and the east, which is behind the train on the right.  Passengers cross from the west to the middle platform at ground level, the crossing is in the right foreground of this image, and at the time the image was captured the ground level crossing was “roped” closed.)

This is my favorite image from the series this week


Sleeping Trains

Interpretive Digital Imaging

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO 1600 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

Sunday evening at the Riverside, California Metrolink Station and the trains “sleep” until the commuting week begins Monday morning.  The engine facing the camera in the middle ground is an Electro Motive Diesel (EMD) F59PH.  Metrolink has 23 of these engines in their fleet, each one weighs 260,000 pounds and they are each capable of generating 3,000 horsepower and a top speed of about 63 miles per hour.  The other engines seen here are EMD ‘s F59PHI which weighs 268,000 pounds generates 3,200 horse power and reaches a top speed of 110 miles per hour; Metrolink has 14 of these engines in service.  (Source on engine specifications Wikipedia.)

As part of my Interpretive Digital Imaging exploration I used Topaz Simplify to reduce details and give all the prominent features a more soft, paint like appearance, with a little tweaking of the strength of edges.  I then masked in a second layer from the unsimplified image to gain back some detail in the engine in the middle ground and all of the lights.


Sunday Freight

Interpretive Digital Imaging

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO1600 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

My photography has been evolving during the past year and I have been experimenting more and more with tools at my disposal to create unique or more painterly like renditions of my images.  (Please see my recent automotive images, in which I modify the context that the main subjects, the cars, are displayed in.)  The exercises that I am engaging in are leading me to seeing my subjects expressed with less documentary objectivity but  instead, expressed with more of my own sensual, and emotional narrative line of thought.   I find myself morphing the images I capture away from photo realism, eliminating or un-focussing details that do not seem necessary to tell the story, or which might distract the viewer, reducing the images to just the essential shapes, colors, lines and tones that expresses what I see but which also might enable another viewer to interpret the scene in a way that completes a story, or creates a feeling in his or her own mind.

This week’s images are another step along the path of painterly renditions for me and I was thinking “what can I classify these images as?”  What genre or style are my images  becoming.  For lack of a better categorization I am going to use the term Interpretive Digital Imaging for the time being.  And I will see where this will go.

It is late Sunday afternoon and while the commuter trains remain idle a BNSF freight train makes its way past the Riverside, California Metrolink commuter rail station.  This image was captured about 30 minutes after the last Metrolink train arrived with Sunday beach goers returning home.  The camera viewpoint is from the top of the pedestrian bridge stairs which lead to the east platform, in the far distance are the San Gabriel and San Bernardino Mountains to the north, poking above the haze and smog layer that extends east from Los Angeles County.


The Corsair

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 22mm ISO 2500 3-bkts f/18 Lr3, HEP1, TpzAdj; PsCS5

This is the Vought F4U Corsair that is in the collection of the Palm Springs Air Museum, Palm Springs, California.  The Corsair was the first United States single engine fighter aircraft to exceed 400 miles per hour.  Between 1940 and 1952 12,571 Corsairs were produced.  During the World War II the Corsair flown by the United States Navy and Marine Corps out flew the Japanese Zero and had a kill ratio of 11:1 against enemy aircraft.  The Corsair was armed with .30 and .50 caliber machine guns, carried bombs and rockets.  Major Gregory “Pappy” Boyington and his “Black Sheep” squadron flew the Corsair and Boyington was credited with 22 enemy kills in the Corsair.  This artifact, like others in the Palm Springs Air Museum is airworthy and is still periodically flown.

During post processing I used the Photoshop Content-Aware Fill and Clone tools to remove distracting elements and re-build part of the lower right quadrant of the image.  I also used Topaz Adjust to get more punch out of the colors and to soften out the noticeable grain that resulted from the high ISO.


Green Hot Rod Detail

Nikon D7000 18-135mm @ 35mm ISO 620 3-bkts f/22 Lr3, HEP1; TpzSim

A closer view and from a slightly different angle of the Green Hot Rod, emphasizing the power plant.  I applied an oil paint effect using the Topaz Labs Simplify plug-in for Photoshop.  This is part of my exploration of painterly effects used with photographic images.  My aim here is not to document, but rather to convey the essence of the scene in a manner that evokes emotional thought.


Waiting For Re-unification

Nikon D80 10-24mm @24mm ISO 200 1/8 f/11 (-2.0 0.0 +2.0) Lr3 HDR Efex Pro

Jet engines stored on the tarmac at Planes of Fame, Chino Airport, Chino, California, waiting to be reunited with the airframes they were designed for.  A significant amount of space at Planes of Fame is given over to storage of aircraft airframe and mechanical components collected for ultimate restoration.  I was attracted to the lines, colors and textures of the various metallic elements and the patina that time out in elements has put on them.  It seems almost sacrilegious to allow these instruments of advanced engineering technology from the hands of man to seemingly be discarded and allowed to be broken down by the potentially destructive powers of Mother Nature, but I am sure these particular objects will eventually be rehabilitated and possibly fly another day.


TLC In Blue

Nikon D80 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO 800 1/180 f/8 (-2.0 0.0 +2.0) Lr3 HDR Efex Pro

This is a Grumman F8F “Bearcat” receiving some tender loving care in the sunshine adjacent to the Fighter Rebuilders hanger at the Planes of Fame museum, Chino Airport, Chino, California.   The Bearcat, one of the still flying aircraft exhibited at the museum, was developed in 1943/44 as a fighter interceptor designed specifically for carrier operations but was not deployed to the fleet by the United States Navy until after the end of the second world war in 1945.  This aircraft is capable of lifting off the deck after a take off run of just 115 feet, and in 1972 a Bearcat broke its own record by achieving an altitude of 18,000 feet 91.9 seconds after take off; in 1989 a Bearcat set the World Speed Record for piston driven aircraft at 528.33 mph.

In post processing this image, I am again reminded of a bad habit I have of getting so excited about an image in my viewfinder, that I lose the benefit of approaching the subject in a slow, deliberative manner, and in the case of this image forgot to adjust the ISO setting down from what I was using inside of a hanger making the previous shots.  The result is a bit of unwanted grainy effect in parts of the aircraft fuselage, elevator and tail.