Images & Observations

Posts tagged “myrtle

Cafe Opera & Bakery

Roadside Americana

Nikon D7000 18-200mm @ 40mm ISO 200 1/125 F/11 Lr4, TpzSim; PsCS6

On Myrtle Avenue in the pedestrian friendly Old Town, Monrovia, California.  There are quite a few restaurants and retauraunt/bars in this neighborhood.

To view in high resolution or to purchase this or similar prints please click here: http://goo.gl/DDUfc

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Urban Study #73

Nikon D7000 18-200mm @ 26mm ISO 200 1/2000, 1/500, 1/125 f/11 Lr4, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS6

Still in Monrovia, California, this is the northwest corner of Foothill and Myrtle, just across Myrtle from the First Presbyterian Church.  I really enjoy capturing urban scenes that are reminiscent of life during the first half of the twentieth century, I think they remind me of my own childhood and the innocence of childhood.  This scene is much more interesting produces a feeling of warmth that is not present in contemporary commercial structures in my opinion.  The white lines breaking up the brickwork and the repetition of the green awnings give me a good feeling in this scene.

The D7000 and the 18-200mm Nikkor lens did a very nice job in capturing a high resolution image in these brackets.  You can actually make out some of the broadcast towers on top of Mt. Wilson in the background, which are approximately 12 miles distant.


Corner Church #52

Nikon D7000 18-200mm @ 26mm ISO 200 3-bkts f/11 Lr4, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

Straddling the northeast corner of Foothill and Myrtle, the First Presbyterian Church in Monrovia, California projects an image of  strength and durability.  If I squint my eyes just right, I see archers on the top of the tower aiming their arrows at me.  Then in a flash during this Tecnicolor dream, my crimson blood pools on the pavement in the foreground.


Sunday At The Movies

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO 800 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1; PsCS5

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO 800 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1; PsCS5

Although the primary mission on the recent evening when we visited Myrtle Avenue in Monrovia, California was to capture images of shop windows by positioning myself directly in front of the windows, I did keep my eye open for other opportunities and when I looked across the street I saw this scene.  The Krikorian is a multi-screen cinema and it opened here sometime during the past decade.  I think that architecturally the owners did a great job of creating a new building that fits in perfectly with the neighborhood ambience created by all of the previous, well established businesses on the street.

A hat tip goes out to Aaron Barlow author of the Delineations of Eye blog who has graciously shared the texture that I layered in on this image (ever so slightly).


Box Jewelers Street Clock

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 14mm ISO 200 3-bkts f/16 Lr3; HEP1

Sometime between 1913 and 1914 Dr. William G. Barks opened a combined optometry and jewelry business at 507 South Myrtle Avenue in Monrovia, California and erected the street clock manufactured by the Brown Street Clock Company.  The clock was originally powered by a spring-wound clock mechanism that was subsequently converted to an electrical powered mechanism.  In 1921 Glen L. Box (FKA Glen L. DeBoxx) bought the jewelry business and the street clock from Dr. Barks.  In 1931 Box moved the business and the clock across the street to 518 South Myrtle Avenue; Glen L. Box died in 1951 and his widow, Ivah Box sold the store and clock to Shields Krutzsch, who then sold the store to Sam and Jeaneane Silverman in 1969.   In 2002 the clock was declared Monrovia Landmark #32 and in 2003 the Silvermans transferred ownership of the clock to the Monrovia Historic Preservation Group.

The clock and various businesses on Myrtle Avenue have been a location of television and motion picture filming at various times due to it’s proximity to Hollywood and the overall small town period look of the businesses on the street.  The city of Monrovia has done a great job rejuvenating the street-scape of its original town center which has attracted viable businesses such as merchandisers, service providers, and the food and beverage sector; attracting residents of the extended local area as a pleasant place to spend their time.

We had a great time capturing this image and the others to come in the blog this week while doing our photo walk on Myrtle Avenue in Monrovia on an early June evening.

A hat tip to the Monrovia Patch which was one of my sources for this post.