Images & Observations

Posts tagged “piston

The Corsair

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 22mm ISO 2500 3-bkts f/18 Lr3, HEP1, TpzAdj; PsCS5

This is the Vought F4U Corsair that is in the collection of the Palm Springs Air Museum, Palm Springs, California.  The Corsair was the first United States single engine fighter aircraft to exceed 400 miles per hour.  Between 1940 and 1952 12,571 Corsairs were produced.  During the World War II the Corsair flown by the United States Navy and Marine Corps out flew the Japanese Zero and had a kill ratio of 11:1 against enemy aircraft.  The Corsair was armed with .30 and .50 caliber machine guns, carried bombs and rockets.  Major Gregory “Pappy” Boyington and his “Black Sheep” squadron flew the Corsair and Boyington was credited with 22 enemy kills in the Corsair.  This artifact, like others in the Palm Springs Air Museum is airworthy and is still periodically flown.

During post processing I used the Photoshop Content-Aware Fill and Clone tools to remove distracting elements and re-build part of the lower right quadrant of the image.  I also used Topaz Adjust to get more punch out of the colors and to soften out the noticeable grain that resulted from the high ISO.


TLC In Blue

Nikon D80 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO 800 1/180 f/8 (-2.0 0.0 +2.0) Lr3 HDR Efex Pro

This is a Grumman F8F “Bearcat” receiving some tender loving care in the sunshine adjacent to the Fighter Rebuilders hanger at the Planes of Fame museum, Chino Airport, Chino, California.   The Bearcat, one of the still flying aircraft exhibited at the museum, was developed in 1943/44 as a fighter interceptor designed specifically for carrier operations but was not deployed to the fleet by the United States Navy until after the end of the second world war in 1945.  This aircraft is capable of lifting off the deck after a take off run of just 115 feet, and in 1972 a Bearcat broke its own record by achieving an altitude of 18,000 feet 91.9 seconds after take off; in 1989 a Bearcat set the World Speed Record for piston driven aircraft at 528.33 mph.

In post processing this image, I am again reminded of a bad habit I have of getting so excited about an image in my viewfinder, that I lose the benefit of approaching the subject in a slow, deliberative manner, and in the case of this image forgot to adjust the ISO setting down from what I was using inside of a hanger making the previous shots.  The result is a bit of unwanted grainy effect in parts of the aircraft fuselage, elevator and tail.