Images & Observations

Posts tagged “planes

P-47G Thunderbolt “Spirit of Atlantic City”

Nikon D80 10-24mm @ 10mm ISO 800 1/20 f/8 Lr4; PsCS6

The P-47 was first introduced in 1942 and saw extensive service in both the European and Pacific theaters of World War II.  15,678 were manufactured and the last active duty aircraft was retired from the Peruvian Air Force in 1966.  The P-47 was big and heavy, and not as tightly maneuverable as other fighter aircraft at the time, but it could dive faster than other aircraft, could carry bombs and rockets, extended fuel tanks and was equipped with eight .50 caliber machine guns mounted in its wings.  The P-47 flew missions escorting bombers, fighting enemy interceptors and also was successful in air to ground warfare, disabling German armored vehicles including exploiting tank vulnerabilities with armor piercing, armor piercing-incendiary and armor piercing-tracer ammunition.  P-47 pilots also became skillful at skip-bombing train tunnels, sealing both ends of a tunnel and sealing German trains inside the tunnels.

This P-47G Thunderbolt is the last flying Thunderbolt with the “razorback: canopy configuration in existence, the razorback limited rear vision and was replaced in subsequent fighter aircraft with the “bubble” canopy.  The “Spirit of Atlantic City” was manufactured in 1944 by Grand Central Aircraft Company, Glendale, California.  Restored once at Kirtland Air Force Base (New Mexico) in 1958-1963 it was housed at various air museums and used in air shows.  On October 23, 1972 the aircraft crashed during a forced landing at an air show at Point Mugu, California and struck an earth embankment.  The “Spirit of Atlantic City” was then rebuilt in Chino, California and returned to flight in 1976 and remains in the flying collection of the Planes of Fame Air Museum, Chino, California.

Prints of this and other aircraft are available here: http://goo.gl/zZohQ .


“Oh, To Fly Again…”

Another salvage jet engine waiting on the tarmac at Planes of Fame Air Museum, Chino, California for another chance to fly.  I am fascinated by the mechanical contrivances that man can devise from inert matter that then have the ability to move matter through time and space.

Prints of this and other aircraft are available here: http://goo.gl/zZohQ .


B-25 “Photo Fanny”

Nikon D80 10-24mm @ 22mm ISO 800 1/20 f/8 Lr4; PsCS6

“Photo Fanny”, a B-25J, was assembled in 1944 and is part of the collection at the Planes of Fame Air Museum, and flies from their hanger at the Chino, California airport.  Photo Fanny has also been known as “Shangrila” and “Betty Grable” and was flown in the 1992 motion picture “Foreever Young” and the 2001 motion picture “Pearl Harbor”, flying off of the carrier USS Constellation.

Prints of this and other aircraft are available here: http://goo.gl/zZohQ .


Waiting For A Second Chance

Nikon D80 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO 200 1/30 f/11 Lr4

A salvaged jet engine on the tarmac at the Planes of Fame Air Museum, Chino, California.  I am fascinated by images of machinery, I believe there is a real beauty in machined parts assembled for a functional purpose.

Prints of this and other aircraft are available here: http://goo.gl/zZohQ .