Images & Observations

Posts tagged “Riverside

Photography Edifice

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO 640 3-bkts f/11 Lr3, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

This is the California Museum of Photography in Riverside, California.  The museum that is operated by the University of California Riverside fronts on the Main Street pedestrian mall.  I have not done any research in to the sculpture that stands in front of the museum, but what I see in it is a human eye looking through a camera view finder, or is it a bowling ball coming through a television screen?


Ready To Roll

Interpretive Digital Imaging

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 13mm ISO 200 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

A final image from the Riverside, California Metrolink station, trackside looking north at two EMD F59PHI engines and the pedestrian bridge linking the west and east platforms.  (There are actually three platforms at this station, the west in the left foreground, the middle, between the two trains, and the east, which is behind the train on the right.  Passengers cross from the west to the middle platform at ground level, the crossing is in the right foreground of this image, and at the time the image was captured the ground level crossing was “roped” closed.)

This is my favorite image from the series this week


Sleeping Trains

Interpretive Digital Imaging

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO 1600 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

Sunday evening at the Riverside, California Metrolink Station and the trains “sleep” until the commuting week begins Monday morning.  The engine facing the camera in the middle ground is an Electro Motive Diesel (EMD) F59PH.  Metrolink has 23 of these engines in their fleet, each one weighs 260,000 pounds and they are each capable of generating 3,000 horsepower and a top speed of about 63 miles per hour.  The other engines seen here are EMD ‘s F59PHI which weighs 268,000 pounds generates 3,200 horse power and reaches a top speed of 110 miles per hour; Metrolink has 14 of these engines in service.  (Source on engine specifications Wikipedia.)

As part of my Interpretive Digital Imaging exploration I used Topaz Simplify to reduce details and give all the prominent features a more soft, paint like appearance, with a little tweaking of the strength of edges.  I then masked in a second layer from the unsimplified image to gain back some detail in the engine in the middle ground and all of the lights.


Signal Tower & Bridge Superstructure

Interpretive Digital Imaging

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 10mm ISO 1600 1/640 f/13 Lr3, ASSA3; PsCS5

This is the signal tower and west end of the pedestrian bridge at the Riverside, California Metrolink Station.  In addition to the stairways, patrons are served by an elevator in the west brick tower and one in the east brick tower, which was the only way I was able to get up on the bridge for yesterday’s image of the freight passing through.

This image is another example of my practicing simplifying images from the initial photo realism in order to convey more of a general feeling of the subjects (instead of a literal representation) so that the viewers’ minds can fill in any details they may imagine.  There is just the hint of the train in the background of this image, but I believe it is enough to enable the viewer to understand there was a train there.

There was much more detail of individual bricks in the elevator tower in my original capture and I purposely softened the detail and over saturated the coloring of the bricks.  I also liked the two converging lines from the crosswalk and upped the saturation and brightness of those as they converged on the tower and bridge.  And of course the processes I applied, including the introduction of a canvas texture resulted in a very painterly rendering.  (This and all of my images are in my gallery and the tools in the gallery will allow you to see the images in full size or near full size, then the texture will become quite apparent.)


Sunday Freight

Interpretive Digital Imaging

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO1600 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

My photography has been evolving during the past year and I have been experimenting more and more with tools at my disposal to create unique or more painterly like renditions of my images.  (Please see my recent automotive images, in which I modify the context that the main subjects, the cars, are displayed in.)  The exercises that I am engaging in are leading me to seeing my subjects expressed with less documentary objectivity but  instead, expressed with more of my own sensual, and emotional narrative line of thought.   I find myself morphing the images I capture away from photo realism, eliminating or un-focussing details that do not seem necessary to tell the story, or which might distract the viewer, reducing the images to just the essential shapes, colors, lines and tones that expresses what I see but which also might enable another viewer to interpret the scene in a way that completes a story, or creates a feeling in his or her own mind.

This week’s images are another step along the path of painterly renditions for me and I was thinking “what can I classify these images as?”  What genre or style are my images  becoming.  For lack of a better categorization I am going to use the term Interpretive Digital Imaging for the time being.  And I will see where this will go.

It is late Sunday afternoon and while the commuter trains remain idle a BNSF freight train makes its way past the Riverside, California Metrolink commuter rail station.  This image was captured about 30 minutes after the last Metrolink train arrived with Sunday beach goers returning home.  The camera viewpoint is from the top of the pedestrian bridge stairs which lead to the east platform, in the far distance are the San Gabriel and San Bernardino Mountains to the north, poking above the haze and smog layer that extends east from Los Angeles County.


The Parsonage

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 12mm ISO 640 1/1600 f/11 Lr3, ASSA; PsCS5

Located on the back side of the First Congregational Church in Riverside, California is its parsonage.  After capturing this image I almost had the urge to donate some paint to the church, but I don’t think I could afford the amount of paint that would be necessary to spruce up the parsonage, and then it would no longer make such an interesting subject.  I applied some painterly effects to this image using Alien Skin Snap Art.


The Chapel Doors

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 18mm ISO 640 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, CEP3; PSCS5

Just beyond the cornerstone is this colonnade that leads to the chapel doors of the First Congregational Church in Riverside, California.  It can get quite warm in Riverside and this passageway gives me a sense of the coolness that can be found in its shelter, and within the stone church building.  I purposely darkened the walls an columns and emphasized the warmth of the two sets of doors, and then also added blur to defocus on the sunny landscape just outside of the scene.  I really like the overhead beams and the doors in this scene combined with the perspective and selective focus.

 


The Cornerstone

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 15mm ISO 640 3-bkts f/11 Lr3, HEP1; CEP3

The cornerstone at the First Congregational Church in Riverside, California was laid on December 1, 1912 and has remained in place with the completed building for 99 years.  While I did take some liberties in terms of  emphasizing the grunge when rendering this image, the building in real life does look almost as worn as it does here.  I don’t know if that is a factor of the material used to construct the  building or not,  but I would expect this kind of “wear” to be present on a building that is five centuries old, but not just under a century as in this  case.

This building and the adjacent parsonage (which I will share later in the week) has a lot of character which is what attracted me to it and I find cornerstones very interesting.  This cornerstone certainly seems to express the beliefs of those who laid it and utilized the finished structure.  It does seem very appropriate if you subscribe to the beliefs, in this context.


Southwest Wing Mission Inn

Nikon D7000 28-300 mm @ 48 mm ISO 640 3-bkts f/11 Lr3, HEP1, PsCS5; ASAA3

This is a wider view from the position where I was when I captured most of the Street Life images that I am displaying this week and next.  The view is looking across part of the open air pedestrian mall that the city of Riverside, California created out of three blocks of Main Street.  This scene is actually bisected by Mission Inn Avenue, where you can see the columnar traffic barriers  in the lower left corner of this image.  In the same area as the traffic barriers is the “bridal party” that I captured and displayed earlier this week in my current Street Life series.  This is a great area to stake out or roam around, capturing the people passing through or hanging out and capturing some of the interesting period architecture.

In terms of capturing people, whether people connected to local business activity, tourists, young people before or after school, people attending local events, inter-generational groups, just every day street life, if you are patient and persistent, you will find it all here.  The Mission Inn is the defining structure in this area with its mixture of architectural styles (as I previously noted here) and in this image I wanted to capture some of the sense of time and place that the structure expresses.  Another aspect of this image that resonates with me is the shape of many of the inn’s windows, with the curve on their tops and the bell curve on top of the pediments, which is replicated in the bell shaped light standards and the bell street ornament in the right middle ground. This structure in Riverside, California stands in a semi-arid area of California that is very near to the low Sonoran desert and I tried to convey that feeling by de-saturating most of the colors in the image and using a tool to suggest a water color rendition.  I finished it off with the addition of dried parchment like texture, but I am a little ambivalent about that, I worry that it is too pronounced.

I welcome any constructive critiques.


The Boathouse On Lake Evans

Exploring Painterly Effects

Nikon D7000 28-300mm @ 36mm ISO 640 3-bkts f/6.3 Lr3, HEP1, PsCS5; ASAA3

Just after capturing the old UP locomotive at the park entrance we meandered over to the (Evans Lake) lakeside where I captured images of some ducks near and on shore, and an image of the Stewarts Boat House, at Fairmount Park, Riverside, California.  Paddle boats are available for rent and the boat house, which incudes a kitchen can also be rented out for private functions.  Fairmount Park was designed by Frederick Law Olmstead, one of the primary landscape architects of Central Park in New York City.

The final image was produced from three hand-held exposures processed in Lightroom and HDR Efex Pro and finished in Photoshop CS5 with Alien Skin Snap Art 3 to achieve an oil on canvas effect.


UP 6051

Another Time

Nikon D7000 28-300mm @ 38mm ISO 640 3-bkts f/9.0 Lr3, HEP1, PsC5; ASSA3

Today’s image was captured  at the intersection of Fairmount Boulevard and Locust Street, at one of the entrances to Fairmount Park, in Riverside, California.  UP 6051 was manufactured by the Baldwin Locomotive Works, in Pennsylvania in 1907.  Locomotive 6051 has a Whyte designation of 2-10-0, thus it has two wheels on the leading axel, ten wheels on the five drive axels and no trailing axel.  The engine weighs 220,500 pounds and was oil fueled.  The locomotive was built for the San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad as number 642.  It was renumber 6051 in 1921 and in 1936 it was leased to the Union Pacific Railroad.  6051 was donated to the city of Riverside in 1943.  It appears that sometime after retirement someone made off with 6051’s bell which would have been mounted on the U-shaped bracket topside.

While Monday’s image of the street tree had characteristics of an impasto painting style, for today’s image I used a colored chalk filter from the Alien Skin Snap Art 3 palette.  I believe this rendition works well displaying the details of the locomotive and also imparting a sense of time past.


Street Tree #199

Exploring Painterly Effects

Nikon D7000 18-135mm @ 18 mm ISO 400 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, PsCS5; ASSA3

Exploring more painterly effects this week I began with this tree that is living at the intersection of Main Street and Mission Inn Avenue in Riverside, California.  The image is a combination of three exposures initially processed in Lightroom and then merged and tone mapped with Nik Software HDR Efex Pro.  Then working with Photoshop the Alien Skin Snap Art filter was applied and slightly tweaked.


First Congregational Church

Nikon D7000 10-24mm at 18mm ISO 640 3-bkts f/16 Lr3; HEP1

The First Congregational Church is located at the corner of Mission Inn Avenue and Lemon Street in Riverside, California.  The church building takes its design cues, which include the arching colonnade from the Mission Inn which is across the street.  From the church’s web site:

The present church building is one of the most significant Spanish Revival structures existing in Southern California. It was designed by Myron Hunt, a leading California architect who also designed the Spanish Wing of the Mission Inn and the Rose Bowl in Pasadena.

The building is a brick structure with a concrete tower. Henry Jekel was the architectural engineer for the Spanish Baroque Churrigueresque tower. The cornerstone was laid December 1, 1912, and the building was dedicated on January 25, 1914. The original cost of the building was $100,000…

For many years the church’s 135′ bell tower was empty. in 1986, Don and Beth Miller began the Carillon Project in memory of their son, Scott. A Carillon was chosen, consisting of 24 bells, each of which rings a different pitch on the chromatic scale. The bells, which are the only pealing bells loacted in Southern California, were manufactured in France. In August 1989 installation began, and on October 1, 1989, the bells were dedicated as a memorialto loved ones and a gift of the church to the community.

The sound of the bells was quite appealing and imparted a sense of well being while we were in the neighborhood.

Processing for this image was fairly straightforward, I did amp up the saturation in the flower blossoms.


The Annex

Another Time

 

Nikon D7000 18-135mm @ 62mm ISO 400 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1; SEP2

Across Sixth Street from the back side of the hotel, sits the Mission Inn Annex in Riverside, California.  As reported in the Riverside Press Enterprise:

The crumbling brick structure behind Riverside’s historic Mission Inn has housed staff and servants, a series of shops, and finally storage, but it has been largely unused for years.

Built in two sections in 1913 and 1926, the annex began as living quarters for first female [which may explain the foot bridge over the street connecting the annex to the hotel and keeping female staff isolated from the street] and then male inn workers. The upper floors were used by the private staff — butlers and maids — of inn guests, said Kevin Hallaran, an archivist for the Riverside Metropolitan Museum.

Now the Mission Inn annex is being considered for a makeover. Riverside city officials are interested in turning the annex into conference space to complement the planned expansion of the nearby convention center.

The building facade is beautiful, however it seems the interior is crumbling and is far from being up to code.  The city of Riverside seems to be well attuned to its architectural heritage and I hope they can rehabilitate this structure.  Worth noting are the rounded arches creating a colonnade along the front of the building’s perimeter, mimicking the arches in the Spanish/Mission Revival architecture of the Mission Inn across the street.  You will find this arch motif in other period structures throughout downtown Riverside.

After initial processing of this image I spent some time working with the color version and tweaking it using Nik’s Color Efex Pro, but in the end decided that it might work better without the full color spectrum and converted it with Nik’s Silver Efex Pro.  I darkened the automobiles and brought their clarity down, while simultaneously pushing up the detail in the building facade, applied a sepia tone, added vignetting and added the burned edges of the border, all to bring the image back to its period in time.


Street Side Contemplation

Street Life

Nikon D7000 28-300mm @ 300mm ISO 320 1/400 f/5.6 Lr3; SEP2

Judy and I spent another afternoon back in Riverside, California recently capturing some architectural images and street life.  This image presented itself to me while I was waiting for Judy who was fetching a yogurt smoothie from a sandwich shop near the intersection of Main Street  and Mission Inn Avenue.  This is a good area hang out and  find tourists, local shoppers, kids and business people passing by throughout the day on the two block section of Main Street that is closed to automotive traffic.

During post processing I used the global Brighten slider in Silver Efex Pro to  lighten the image overall, particularly the cars in the background and the street pavers in the foreground, and also applied the blue filter to lighten up the black car in the background.  I then used selective control points to move the Brightness slider in the opposite direction as the background slider movement to darken the man; brought up the contrast on the man.  I applied a cyan tone and a reverse vignetting effect on the corners to brighten them.


The Seth Thomas Clock

Another Time

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @24mm ISO 320 3-bkts f/10 Lr3, HDR Efex Pro, SEP2; PsCS5

This is the Seth Thomas four-dial post street clock currently installed and operating at the corner of Mission Inn Avenue and Main Street in Riverside, California.  It was originally manufactured and installed in Riverside in 1904.  There was a Seth Thomas clock that pre-dated this one that was installed in Riverside in 1885 that used the Seth Thomas movement #15.  I do not know if the first clock remains in existence.

The origins of the Seth Thomas clock go back to Seth Thomas (1785-1859) who had been building clocks in Thomaston (formerly Plymouth Hollow), Connecticut since 1814.  After Thomas’ death in 1859, Aaron Thomas took control of the company and it grew to be one of the premier American clock manufacturers and was a major supplier of tower and street clocks during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  Seth Thomas also made pocket watches in the same factory from 1884 to 1915.

I processed this image as usual in Lightroom and HDR Efex Pro, then converted to black and white using Silver Efex Pro 2, toned it, and then attempted to reveal the color of the clock using a function of the control point tool in SEP2, but the software did not seem to be cooperating with me (maybe my toning threw it off).  I then sandwiched the black and white, and full color images in Photoshop, and masked in the color on the clock.


Urban Parking

 

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO 320 1/25 f/10 Lr3; SEP2

We are back at the Loring Building one more time this week.  Gasoline is currently going for just over $5.00 a gallon in Southern California, so this mode of personal transportation and parking is relatively thrifty.   I am not sure how well this fellow will do on a day when the temperature reachers triple digits, it was in the 60-70 range the day this image was captured.

I used the Wet Rocks Silver Efex Pro filter on this and added a cyanotype tone and the black border.  Did a little burning in on the stone column on the right with the adjustment brush, then sharpened and noise reduction  in Lightroom,


The Loring Building

From the Another Time series:

Nikon D7000 10-24mm 13mm ISO 320 f/11 Lr3, HDR Efex Pro; Color Efex Pro; PsCS5

Charles Morgridge Loring (November 13, 1833–March 18, 1922) was a wealthy flour miller and civic leader in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  With other local partners, Miller co-founded the Minnesota Electric Light and Electric Motive Power Company and created the first hydroelectric power plant in the United States in 1891.  Loring’s mill holdings eventually became a part of General Mills.

Loring also maintained a winter home in Riverside, California.  In Riverside Loring built the Loring Building in the Richardsonian Romanesque style in 1890 from a design by architect A.C.Willard, this building was remodeled in 1918 to resemble more closely the Mission Revival architecture of neighboring structures.  (The Loring Building is across Main Street from the Mission Inn.)  Originally the home of City Hall, the municipal courts and public library, this building once featured an adjoining opera house as part of the Orphum Theatrical Circuit. Its stage played host to W. C. Fields, Sarah Bernhardt and other premier entertainers of the era.The Loring Opera House was destroyed by fire in 1990.

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 20mm ISO 320 3-bkts f/11 Lr3, HDR Efex Pro, CEP3; PsCS5

The raw images in this posting were processed in Lightroom, then in HDR Efex Pro, then tweaked in Color Efex Pro; sharpening and noise reduction was executed back in Lightroom.  The smaller image on this page captures some of the detail in the building, contrasting the rough stone with the smooth wood trimmed facade.  The larger image of the entire building was also worked in Photoshop to correct the perspective distortion from the tilted lens.


Music On The Wall

 

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 20mm ISO 320 3-bkts f/16 Lr3; HDR Efex Pro

Mario’s Place is an upscale Italian restaurant in the center of town in Riverside, California.  The Mission Inn is across the street and the building in the left foreground is the former Riverside City Hall.  Mario’s is not the kind of place that you go to enjoy red and white checkered table cloths, and spaghetti and meatballs.  In addition to fine dining Mario’s features live musical acts and has a DJ spinning tunes in a club space that you get to through the alleyway that the building abuts in this image.

While the painting on the side of the building is an eye catcher I was also interested in the detailing on both building facades, which give me an overall feeling of being in an earlier, less technologically complex era.  There are quite a few interesting structures around Riverside from the past and the city has done an excellent job of preserving their architectural history.   I plan to spend more time in the future roving around Riverside capturing images and visiting the California Museum of Photography which is operated by the University of California Riverside and is only about three blocks from this site.


Local Icons: Riverside

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 17mm ISO 200 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HDR Efex Pro; PsCS5

Sharing the corner of Sixth and Main (foreground) Streets in Riverside, California are two icons of Riverside history, the Mission Inn and a navel orange tree with a bountiful crop of fruit.  The Mission Inn’s origin was an adobe boarding house built by Christopher Columbus Miller in 1876, in 1903 his son, Frank Miller took control of the property and began a decades long building spree that eventually eliminated the original structure and replaced it, piece-meal with a much more ambitious structure that is commonly known as the largest Mission Revival Style building in the United States.

This image only hints at the panoply of architectural components that comprise the entire site, with various components designed by architects Arthur B. Benton, Myron Hunt and G. Stanley Wilson and which reflect Spanish Gothic, Moorish Revival, Spanish Colonial, Spanish Colonial Revival, Renaissance Revival, and Mediterranean Revival Style architecture.

The orange tree is very significant to Riverside residents as the national commercial production and marketing of the navel orange began with the first two trees trees planted by Eliza Tibbets (from specimens collected in Brazil by the U.S. Department of Agriculture) in 1873.  In the early 20th century Southern California became the center of the citrus fruit industry in the United States.

Using layers and masking in Photoshop I desaturated most of the image, and then brought out the color saturation in the tree.  I also removed some distracting elements. I am still having focus issues and am not satisfied with the sharpness of this image.

Author’s note: Can you find my cloning error in the original image rendition?