Images & Observations

Posts tagged “Riverside

Photography Edifice

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO 640 3-bkts f/11 Lr3, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

This is the California Museum of Photography in Riverside, California.  The museum that is operated by the University of California Riverside fronts on the Main Street pedestrian mall.  I have not done any research in to the sculpture that stands in front of the museum, but what I see in it is a human eye looking through a camera view finder, or is it a bowling ball coming through a television screen?


Ready To Roll

Interpretive Digital Imaging

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 13mm ISO 200 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

A final image from the Riverside, California Metrolink station, trackside looking north at two EMD F59PHI engines and the pedestrian bridge linking the west and east platforms.  (There are actually three platforms at this station, the west in the left foreground, the middle, between the two trains, and the east, which is behind the train on the right.  Passengers cross from the west to the middle platform at ground level, the crossing is in the right foreground of this image, and at the time the image was captured the ground level crossing was “roped” closed.)

This is my favorite image from the series this week


Sleeping Trains

Interpretive Digital Imaging

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO 1600 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

Sunday evening at the Riverside, California Metrolink Station and the trains “sleep” until the commuting week begins Monday morning.  The engine facing the camera in the middle ground is an Electro Motive Diesel (EMD) F59PH.  Metrolink has 23 of these engines in their fleet, each one weighs 260,000 pounds and they are each capable of generating 3,000 horsepower and a top speed of about 63 miles per hour.  The other engines seen here are EMD ‘s F59PHI which weighs 268,000 pounds generates 3,200 horse power and reaches a top speed of 110 miles per hour; Metrolink has 14 of these engines in service.  (Source on engine specifications Wikipedia.)

As part of my Interpretive Digital Imaging exploration I used Topaz Simplify to reduce details and give all the prominent features a more soft, paint like appearance, with a little tweaking of the strength of edges.  I then masked in a second layer from the unsimplified image to gain back some detail in the engine in the middle ground and all of the lights.


Signal Tower & Bridge Superstructure

Interpretive Digital Imaging

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 10mm ISO 1600 1/640 f/13 Lr3, ASSA3; PsCS5

This is the signal tower and west end of the pedestrian bridge at the Riverside, California Metrolink Station.  In addition to the stairways, patrons are served by an elevator in the west brick tower and one in the east brick tower, which was the only way I was able to get up on the bridge for yesterday’s image of the freight passing through.

This image is another example of my practicing simplifying images from the initial photo realism in order to convey more of a general feeling of the subjects (instead of a literal representation) so that the viewers’ minds can fill in any details they may imagine.  There is just the hint of the train in the background of this image, but I believe it is enough to enable the viewer to understand there was a train there.

There was much more detail of individual bricks in the elevator tower in my original capture and I purposely softened the detail and over saturated the coloring of the bricks.  I also liked the two converging lines from the crosswalk and upped the saturation and brightness of those as they converged on the tower and bridge.  And of course the processes I applied, including the introduction of a canvas texture resulted in a very painterly rendering.  (This and all of my images are in my gallery and the tools in the gallery will allow you to see the images in full size or near full size, then the texture will become quite apparent.)


Sunday Freight

Interpretive Digital Imaging

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO1600 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

My photography has been evolving during the past year and I have been experimenting more and more with tools at my disposal to create unique or more painterly like renditions of my images.  (Please see my recent automotive images, in which I modify the context that the main subjects, the cars, are displayed in.)  The exercises that I am engaging in are leading me to seeing my subjects expressed with less documentary objectivity but  instead, expressed with more of my own sensual, and emotional narrative line of thought.   I find myself morphing the images I capture away from photo realism, eliminating or un-focussing details that do not seem necessary to tell the story, or which might distract the viewer, reducing the images to just the essential shapes, colors, lines and tones that expresses what I see but which also might enable another viewer to interpret the scene in a way that completes a story, or creates a feeling in his or her own mind.

This week’s images are another step along the path of painterly renditions for me and I was thinking “what can I classify these images as?”  What genre or style are my images  becoming.  For lack of a better categorization I am going to use the term Interpretive Digital Imaging for the time being.  And I will see where this will go.

It is late Sunday afternoon and while the commuter trains remain idle a BNSF freight train makes its way past the Riverside, California Metrolink commuter rail station.  This image was captured about 30 minutes after the last Metrolink train arrived with Sunday beach goers returning home.  The camera viewpoint is from the top of the pedestrian bridge stairs which lead to the east platform, in the far distance are the San Gabriel and San Bernardino Mountains to the north, poking above the haze and smog layer that extends east from Los Angeles County.


The Parsonage

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 12mm ISO 640 1/1600 f/11 Lr3, ASSA; PsCS5

Located on the back side of the First Congregational Church in Riverside, California is its parsonage.  After capturing this image I almost had the urge to donate some paint to the church, but I don’t think I could afford the amount of paint that would be necessary to spruce up the parsonage, and then it would no longer make such an interesting subject.  I applied some painterly effects to this image using Alien Skin Snap Art.


The Chapel Doors

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 18mm ISO 640 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, CEP3; PSCS5

Just beyond the cornerstone is this colonnade that leads to the chapel doors of the First Congregational Church in Riverside, California.  It can get quite warm in Riverside and this passageway gives me a sense of the coolness that can be found in its shelter, and within the stone church building.  I purposely darkened the walls an columns and emphasized the warmth of the two sets of doors, and then also added blur to defocus on the sunny landscape just outside of the scene.  I really like the overhead beams and the doors in this scene combined with the perspective and selective focus.

 


The Cornerstone

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 15mm ISO 640 3-bkts f/11 Lr3, HEP1; CEP3

The cornerstone at the First Congregational Church in Riverside, California was laid on December 1, 1912 and has remained in place with the completed building for 99 years.  While I did take some liberties in terms of  emphasizing the grunge when rendering this image, the building in real life does look almost as worn as it does here.  I don’t know if that is a factor of the material used to construct the  building or not,  but I would expect this kind of “wear” to be present on a building that is five centuries old, but not just under a century as in this  case.

This building and the adjacent parsonage (which I will share later in the week) has a lot of character which is what attracted me to it and I find cornerstones very interesting.  This cornerstone certainly seems to express the beliefs of those who laid it and utilized the finished structure.  It does seem very appropriate if you subscribe to the beliefs, in this context.