Images & Observations

Posts tagged “square

Palms Depot

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 11mm ISO 400 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, ASSnapArt3; PsCS5

The Palms Depot was built in 1887 when it overlooked a grid of new streets in the subdivision of Palms, which was the only urbanized area between Los Angeles and the Pacific Ocean in Santa Monica.  A few years later the Palms Depot became a part of the Southern Pacific Railroad, it was electrified in 1908 and served passenger and freight traffic until 1933 when the railroad transferred its functions to Culver Junction.  The Palms Depot continued to serve the Pacific Electric Railway’s trolly service for 20 more years, until terminated in 1953.  The architectural style of the Palms Depot is Eastlake, and it served as a motion picture backdrop for Laurel & Hardy and Little Rascal films.  The depot was moved to Heritage Square, Los Angeles in 1975, where it was restored and is used as the Visitor Center.

Please click on the image to view in high resolution.  Click here to view the depot “back in the day”.


Church At The End Of The Lane

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO 400 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

Lincoln Avenue Methodist Church had its cornerstone laid on September 21, 1897 at the intersection of Lincoln Avenue and North Orange Grove Boulevard in Pasadena, California, which was surrounded by orange groves at the time; a U.S. Postal facility now stands where the church originally stood.  In 1981 the church was cut up in to six pieces and moved to Heritage Square in Los Angeles.

Please click on the image to view in high resolution.


William Hayes Perry Residence

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 13mm ISO 400 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

Designed by E.F. Kysor, the Perry residence was erected in 1876 in the Boyle Heights section of Los Angeles for lumber barron William Hayes Perry.  The classic Greek Revival Italianate building was accepted in its era as one of the finest, most expensive homes in the city.  In 1975 the house sat neglected and vandalized in its original location and was moved to Heritage Square by its owners, the Colonial Dames Society of America.  In 1995 the house was deeded to the Heritage Square Museum, where restoration was ongoing.

Please click on the image to view in high resolution.


Hale House: Another Angle

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 17mm ISO 400 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

A recurring subject in the blog, another angle on Hale House in Heritage Square in Los Angeles.  You may compare it to the previous version here.

Please click on the image to view in high resolution.


View From Plaza Square Park

Nikon D7000 18-200mm @ 44mm ISO 800 3-bkts f/22 Lr3, HEP1,TpzSim; PsCS5

Another image from the city of Orange, California, this is the view from Plaza Square Park looking toward the south east corner of the plaza.

Click on the image to see the high resolution version.


Hale House

Another Time

Nikon D7000 18-135mm @ 20mm ISO 200 7-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1; PsCS5

Prior to capturing the image of the “Heritage Boxcar” that I posted this past Monday, I captured a few sets of brackets of the Hale House at Heritage Square, Los Angeles.  The Hale House was constructed in 1887 in the Queen Anne and Eastlake styles by George W. Morgan who was a land speculator and real estate developer.  The house was moved from its original location to a second location and changed hands a number of times before being purchased by James Gl Hale.  Hale lived in the house a few years until he separated from his wife Bessie.  After the separation Bessie Hale retained title to the house and lived in it until her death in a rest home in 1967, and ran the house as a boarding home for much of that time.  The house was donated to the Cultural Heritage Foundation by Bessie Hale’s heir in 1970 and it was moved to its current location.

I have to say I am fairly proud of this image, I think it demonstrates that I have made some more progress practicing my HDR techniques.  I started by mounting the Nikon D7000 on a tripod with the 18-135mm lens and with my Promote Control interfaced to the camera.  I had Judy hold up a gray card in front of the house for one shot.   I fired off a few sets of seven brackets (-3 EV to +3 EV) with slightly varying perspectives on the house and converted the camera raw files to DNG in Lightroom.  Initially in the Lightroom Develop module I used the automatic color correction tool to key on the gray card and set the proper color setting on all the files, and I also used the automatic lens correction tool to correct any distortion.  I exported the selected seven brackets to Nik’s HDR Efex Pro and applied one of the Realistic pre-sets which I then tweaked, then  I converted to TIFF and sent the image file back to Lightroom.  I then opened the HDR TIFF file and the middle bracket (-0-) DNG file in Photoshop.  I then used layer masking to overlay the top of the chimney and the sky from the middle bracket to correct the top of the chimney which was blown out in the HDR and to replace a halo-ed sky with a clean sky.  I also used content aware fill in Photoshop to remove a water faucet, garden hose, and some scattered cinder blocks from the lawn in front of the house.  Back in Lightroom I made a slight crop to remove some of the gravel foreground, sharpened and applied minimal noise filtering.


Heritage Boxcar

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 15mm ISO 400 3-bkts f/22 Lr3, HEP1, CEP3; PsCS5

This old boxcar is resting on the western edge of Heritage Square, hard by the Pasadena Freeway (the nation’s first freeway) in Los Angeles.  As an example of great minds thinking alike I captured this image at about the same time that Van Sutherland captured a similar image, two time zones away.  Van titled his image “Character” and you will find it on his blog Exile Imaging.  Van’s version is more realistic than my interpretation, my excuse is that he had a better weathered subject than I did, covered with some great peeling paint, so I had to rely more upon slight of hand to make my surfaces more interesting.