Images & Observations

Posts tagged “truck

Modified Yellow Pick-up

Nikon D7000 18-200mm @ 34mm ISO 200 1/400 f/9 Lr4; PsCS6

You wouldn’t want to be driving this during a rainy day, but for a typical sunny southern California day this would be perfect for carting things around in.  Captured at the Chino  Valley Fire Foundation Car & Bike show, May 19, 2012, Chino Hills, California.

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Chino Fire Station 61

Nikon D7000 18-200mm @ 18mm ISO 200 1/2000 f/11 Lr4, TpzSim; PsCS5

Chino Valley Independent Fire District, Station 61 on Schaefer Avenue in Chino, California.  Their training facility occupies architecturally similar buildings adjacent, just out of frame on the right side (I’m working on a pano of the entire complex to share in the future).  The geometry and then the colors make this image for me.  I like the horizontal lines, the strong vertical lines of the light standard and the flag pole, and the strong diagonal line from the curb in the left foreground.  I also like the repetition of the square and rectangular shapes.


Always Prepared

Nikon D7000 18-200mm @ 48mm ISO 200 (-2EV, 0, +2EV) f/10 Lr4, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS6

Captured during one of our recent photo walks in Monrovia, California, the local fire house.


Hose #1; An Exercise In Post Processing

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 12mm ISO 1600 1/20 +2EV -2EV f/8 Lr3, HEP1, CEP3; PsCS5

We are still at the San Bernardino Railroad & History Museum this week, and as we started last week off with a vintage piece of fire fighting apparatus, this week starts with a view of SAN B’DINO HOSE No. 1, a horse drawn truck for transporting the fire hose to the fire.

As with the majority of my images, the three frames that make up this image were shot hand-held.  The camera raw images were converted to DNG in Lightroom and then processed with Nik Software’s HDR Efrex Pro using a custom preset that I had previously devised.  This composited the three images together and tone mapped the result.  I used a custom preset in HDR Exfex Pro that I had previously devised, and the composite image only required very minimal “tweaking”.  The image was then moved in to Photo Shop and a duplicate background layer was created which then had a Gaussian blur applied.  I then masked out the fire truck, removing the blur from the truck.  A duplicate layer was created and then processed in Nik’s Color Efex Pro 3, the entire image, except the masked out truck, was modified by applying Color Efex Pro’s Midnight-Bright Sepia filter.  There was minor fine tuning along the way, and I spent some time magnifying the image and cleaning up edges of masking that overlapped, or underlapped.

I thoroughly enjoyed post processing this image and I think it has a nice, vintage feel to it, yet retains great clarity and detail on the truck.

Please click on the image to view it in high resolution.


The Original Hook & Ladder Truck

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 14mm ISO 1600 3-bkts f/16 Lr3; HEP1

One of the artifacts on display at the San Bernardino Railroad & History Museum, San Bernardino, California is this hook and ladder “truck” that dates back to the 1900’s.  If you look closely you can see the hook protruding from the red ring hanger that is attached to the rear of the truck chasis.

The Los Angeles County Fire Museum also displays an early hook and ladder and had this to say about it on their web site:

The fact that it is hand drawn, and not horse drawn, does not mean that it is older than horse drawn equipment. Small towns that did not require large firefighting equipment did not invest in the expense of having horses. So this vehicle may have served a small town or village, and they elected to stay with hand drawn equipment because they did not need the more capable, more expensive steam fire engines or horse drawn equipment…

It carried ground ladders and a roof ladder. A roof ladder is a ladder that has hooks that are spring loaded on the tip of the ladder that could turn perpendicular to the ladder so that the ladder could lay flat on the peak of the roof. The hooks would grab the ridge and hold the ladder in place so that the firefighters could work off the ladders. This is particularly helpful when there is a steep pitched roof. Especially when it is wet, it can be very hard for a firefighter to keep his footing. So, the roof ladder is used to provide better footing and safety.

It also carried axes and picks, and also the famed “hook”, giving it the name “Hook and Ladder”. The hook was used to pull down damaged buildings or chimneys to stop the spread of fire by creating a fire break. Sometimes, in early chimneys, the fire would get going in them and they could not put it out. So, they would just pull the chimneys down with the hook. The hook and a chain and a rope, and they used a long stick to get the hook up to the height to whatever they needed to grab, whatever piece of the building they needed to grab onto. They would use the chain and the rope hooked to the building, and a bunch of men would grab that to pull the wall down, or pull the chimney down.

Please click on either image to view in full resolution.

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO 1600 3-bkts f/13 Lr3; HEP1


Weekend Warrior

Nikon D7000 18-200mm @ 28mm ISO 200 3-bkts f/20 Lr3, HEP1, TpzSim; PsCS5

This vintage GMC pick-up was on display at the Chino American Legion car show in Chino, California this past November.  The owner had spotted me capturing images and asked if I was a pro, I handed him a business card, and told him yes, I do a lot of cars.  He got excited and asked if I could take some shots of his truck, he really wanted to get a large print to display in his garage, I agreed and he subsequently repositioned the truck a few times while I was photographing it so I could get the best angles and I spent about 20 minutes shooting just his truck.

Normally in these car shows I am capturing images on spec, so there is no real pressure to deliver product.  In this case the guy was so excited and seemed so hungry for images of his truck that the next couple of days I knocked myself out post processing his truck’s images.  I put a variety of images in various interpretations up in my gallery for the guy to choose from.  I had under-promised when the images would be ready and actually put them in the gallery much sooner than promised.  So that was more than a month ago, and I have never heard from the guy.  That is just how the chips fall I suppose, but nothing ventured, nothing gained.

If you would like to see the other images of his truck and the other vehicles at the car show, please click here.


Running Gear

Interpretive Digital Imaging

Nikon D7000 10-24mm @ 24mm ISO 200 3-bkts f/16 Lr3, HEP1, CEP3, TpzSim; PsCS5

This is the forward truck assembly on one of Metrolink’s EMD F59PH locomotives.  There is a wheel here and what I believe is brake equipment.  I really enjoy capturing images of mechanical devices, I believe they are great examples of sculptural art.  As with the other images I am sharing this week I practiced rendering the final image in a painterly style.  I played with overall contrast, adjusted highlights and shadows, modified color tones and reduced details.

I’d appreciate feedback from viewers of these images, what do you think of the painterly effects I am using, and would you like to see more images of mechanical or industrial equipment handled this way.


Yellow Pick-Up #16

Car Show Fortnight

Nikon D7000 18-135mm @ 28mm ISO 640 3-bkts f/22 Lr3, HEP1, ASSA3; PsCS5

I’m not sure how much, if any work gets done with this modified convertible pick-up truck, but I would imagine it would be fun to cruise around in, with maybe an ice chest full of cold beverages in the bed.  This yellow machine was strutting its stuff at the Old Pomona Classic Car & Hot Rod Show in July of 2011 on a very hot day.  Initial processing was with Lightroom and HDR Efex Pro; I applied painterly effects to the image using Alien Skin Snap Art 3 and blurred the background in Photoshop.